@Calabria Mia Importation 2018

@Calabria Mia Importation 2018

About black olive oil

The difference between green and black olives

Olives, whatever their colour, are essentially the same fruit, picked at different stages of ripening. All olives start off life green. They then grow and ripen to a yellowish hue, before turning red and deep purple and ending up black and soft and distinctly oily, blessed with months of that hot sun and fertile soil. But just like grapes or apples, different olive varieties come in distinctly different sizes, textures and flavours.

The vast majority of olive oils available on the market use a blend of both green and black olivesGreen olives are robust and stronger in taste; black olives are milder in flavour and give oil its suppleness. True, some olive oils use just green olives, but olive oil made from just black olives is incredibly rare. Olive oil made from ripe, or black olives, has a buttery-smooth richness to it. It is warm, mellow, comforting, subtle, with a nutty kind of appeal

Cultivation and climate

The olive tree will tolerate poor, rocky soil and so thrives in mountainous parts of Spain, Italy and Greece which are otherwise unsuitable for crop planting, even though it yields more fruit in undulating or lowland sites. It will not tolerate frosts below – 7°C (18°F), prolonged cold weather or excessively high annual rainfall but needs a stable cycle of hot, dry summers, short, wet springs and autumns and mild winters, with plenty of sunshine throughout the year. It will, however, withstand the high winds often experienced in this part of the world. When trees are apparently killed by cold, as happened in Tuscany in 1985, the base and roots will throw up fresh shoots, but it will be some years before these are mature enough to flower and fruit. The mean annual temperature range for olive cultivation is 16-23°C (61-74°F).The countries bordering the Mediterranean sea produce most of the world’s olives, nearly all of which are crushed for oil, and the rest – about 10 per cent – are preserved for eating. These countries possess an estimated 800 million trees, with 500 million in the European Community.

Harvesting

Olive trees flower at the end of the winter and in the spring and the fruit develops very slowly, turning from green to pink and purple and finally to black when fully ripe. The tree produces flowers and fruit on the previous year’s wood, and a good year tends to be followed by a less fruitful one. Calabria Mia Black olives are usually harvested from October to November. Decanting Time is in December, shipping in January and distribute in February, March and April.

There is considerable variation in the times and techniques of harvesting. Growers in some countries allow the olives to fall of their own accord on to nets or on to cleared, prepared ground, while others beat or shake the fruit off the branches, with sticks and poles, rakes or mechanical shakers, or climb up ladders to pick them by hand before they are ripe enough to fall spontaneously.

Oil extraction

As olives must be processed very soon after delivery to the mill, before fermentation sets in, milling is often started only a few hours later, and certainly within two or three days: this short delay is thought to assist oil extraction by conditioning the olives. Next, the olives are washed in cold water, then drained, before being crushed to break up the tissues and release the oil. This can be done by traditional methods, with mechanical rollers, or in modern, stainless steel crushers which work by simultaneously cutting, shearing and rubbing. (This method is ex­tremely quick and efficient but tiny metal particles do get into the oil.) Then they are ground into a smooth paste, stones (pits) and all, the purpose of which is to concentrate the small droplets released on crushing into larger drops of oil, while generating heat to encourage the oil to flow freely. (The stones harbour a lot of oil.) Traditionally, the paste is now spread out on to natural fibre mats which will be stacked layer upon layer in a vertical press to extract, with relatively little pressure, what is known as the first cold pressing of oil. Alternatively the oil can be extracted in a continuous centrifuge.First the olives are brought in and laid out, usually in an outdoor receiving area where they can be checked for condition and sorted according to their maturation, which will influence the acidity level of the ensuing oil. Any leaves and twigs still adhering to them will be removed, either manually or with industrial blowers.

If a modern centrifuge is used for oil extraction, the paste produced by milling and crushing is fed into the machine, which spins at high velocity to separate the oil from the pulp. The oil emerging from press or centrifuge is actually a reddish mixture of oil, veget­able matter and water. This can be decanted manually or put into another centrifuge to separate the oil from the water.

About black olive oil

The difference between green and black olives

Olives, whatever their colour, are essentially the same fruit, picked at different stages of ripening. All olives start off life green. They then grow and ripen to a yellowish hue, before turning red and deep purple and ending up black and soft and distinctly oily, blessed with months of that hot sun and fertile soil. But just like grapes or apples, different olive varieties come in distinctly different sizes, textures and flavours.

The vast majority of olive oils available on the market use a blend of both green and black olivesGreen olives are robust and stronger in taste; black olives are milder in flavour and give oil its suppleness. True, some olive oils use just green olives, but olive oil made from just black olives is incredibly rare. Olive oil made from ripe, or black olives, has a buttery-smooth richness to it. It is warm, mellow, comforting, subtle, with a nutty kind of appeal

Cultivation and climate

The olive tree will tolerate poor, rocky soil and so thrives in mountainous parts of Spain, Italy and Greece which are otherwise unsuitable for crop planting, even though it yields more fruit in undulating or lowland sites. It will not tolerate frosts below – 7°C (18°F), prolonged cold weather or excessively high annual rainfall but needs a stable cycle of hot, dry summers, short, wet springs and autumns and mild winters, with plenty of sunshine throughout the year. It will, however, withstand the high winds often experienced in this part of the world. When trees are apparently killed by cold, as happened in Tuscany in 1985, the base and roots will throw up fresh shoots, but it will be some years before these are mature enough to flower and fruit. The mean annual temperature range for olive cultivation is 16-23°C (61-74°F).The countries bordering the Mediterranean sea produce most of the world’s olives, nearly all of which are crushed for oil, and the rest – about 10 per cent – are preserved for eating. These countries possess an estimated 800 million trees, with 500 million in the European Community.

Harvesting

Olive trees flower at the end of the winter and in the spring and the fruit develops very slowly, turning from green to pink and purple and finally to black when fully ripe. The tree produces flowers and fruit on the previous year’s wood, and a good year tends to be followed by a less fruitful one. Calabria Mia Black olives are usually harvested from October to November. Decanting Time is in December, shipping in January and distribute in February, March and April.

There is considerable variation in the times and techniques of harvesting. Growers in some countries allow the olives to fall of their own accord on to nets or on to cleared, prepared ground, while others beat or shake the fruit off the branches, with sticks and poles, rakes or mechanical shakers, or climb up ladders to pick them by hand before they are ripe enough to fall spontaneously.

Oil extraction

As olives must be processed very soon after delivery to the mill, before fermentation sets in, milling is often started only a few hours later, and certainly within two or three days: this short delay is thought to assist oil extraction by conditioning the olives. Next, the olives are washed in cold water, then drained, before being crushed to break up the tissues and release the oil. This can be done by traditional methods, with mechanical rollers, or in modern, stainless steel crushers which work by simultaneously cutting, shearing and rubbing. (This method is ex­tremely quick and efficient but tiny metal particles do get into the oil.) Then they are ground into a smooth paste, stones (pits) and all, the purpose of which is to concentrate the small droplets released on crushing into larger drops of oil, while generating heat to encourage the oil to flow freely. (The stones harbour a lot of oil.) Traditionally, the paste is now spread out on to natural fibre mats which will be stacked layer upon layer in a vertical press to extract, with relatively little pressure, what is known as the first cold pressing of oil. Alternatively the oil can be extracted in a continuous centrifuge.First the olives are brought in and laid out, usually in an outdoor receiving area where they can be checked for condition and sorted according to their maturation, which will influence the acidity level of the ensuing oil. Any leaves and twigs still adhering to them will be removed, either manually or with industrial blowers.

If a modern centrifuge is used for oil extraction, the paste produced by milling and crushing is fed into the machine, which spins at high velocity to separate the oil from the pulp. The oil emerging from press or centrifuge is actually a reddish mixture of oil, veget­able matter and water. This can be decanted manually or put into another centrifuge to separate the oil from the water.

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